Wednesday, 23 May 2012

Raggle taggle

On Monday we had incessant rain and everything was awash. It has now drained away even on our claggy soil though it remains a bit squelchy underfoot here and there. Yesterday the sun appeared sort of... it was still a bit hazy and there were plenty of clouds about but it was a start.
colour co-ordination
The butterflies, other insects and beasties are starting to respond to this better weather and we saw some scarce swallowtails fluttering about their favourite bush. We have no idea of the name of this flowering bush but the butterflies, especially the scarce swallowtails, love it. Last year the bush seemed alive as the scarce swallowtail is almost the same colour as the flowers and there were loads of them feeding away.
raggedy swallowtail
Yesterday we saw 3 or 4 and they were a bit bedraggled with their 'swallowtails' being more than a bit shredded; we assume due to the recent poor weather conditions, but they made a nice show.
bees are out too
If anyone knows what the name of the bush is please let us know.

Update 24.05.2012: The bush, we've been informed, is a philladelphus, commonly known as Mock Orange. Thanks to all the experts who helped us out! 

23 comments:

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Niall and Antoinette:
It is surprising how quickly things come into flower and grow when the temperature just warms up slightly. The garden can go from ordered to chaotic in an instant!

But, how lovely to have the birds and bees back in action. Your white flowered shrub looks so attractive. Possibly it is a type of Spirea but it is difficult to tell. Whatever it is lovely and the snowy white flowers so delicate!

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

We have really not warmed up enough for anything much to happen here!!! Thankfully it was a little sunny yesterday when we met up with Leon and Sue. Post to follow sometime! Diane

Pollygarter said...

Looks like a Mock Orange.

ladybird said...

As a child I was always on the look-out for these magnificient butterflies. They are called 'Koningspage' in Dutch and the name really tickled my imagination. Although I must admit that I liked its 'female' equivalent even better: the 'Koninginnepage'.
Can't help you with the name of the bush ... sorry! Martine

the fly in the web said...

Wonderful image of that bush alive with swallowtails...

the fly in the web said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Niall & Antoinette said...

@Jane & Lance - it is indeed amazing how everything 'explodes' and right now ours is tending towards the chaotic :-)

Think Pauline might be right as the bush is delicately scented and reminds me somewhat of orange.

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Diane - sunny and a lovely 24/25C here right now; so enjoying the afternoon :-)

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Pauline -- sounds right as the bush is scented and smells a bit of orange. Thanks!

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Martine - what a super name and agree 'koninginnenpage' sounds nicer. Knew the word was for a butterfly but didn't know it refered to this butterfly. So have learnt something new :-)

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Fly - it just made us feel as if we are finally getting some summer-ish weather.
This morning [driving up to do some work in Tours] it cleared and now it is a 'proper' summer's day.

GaynorB said...

I think the shrub is a mock orange too.

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Gaynor - well, with 2 of you saying so; a mock orange it is!

Susan said...

The shrub is what I would call Philadelphus, and I think that is what it is usually sold as, although I have heard it called Mock Orange before.

Tim said...

Yes, it is a Philadelphus... sold in the UK under its common name of Mock Orange, more often than its true name... BUT there are other orange scented, white flowered bushes also called Mock Orange [including a rather sick looking double flowered version of Philly DelPus

ladyjustine said...

I was going to say philadelphus, but it seems everybody else has!

I've nominated you for the versatile blogger award on my blog because I love reading your blog so much!

http://ladyjustine.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/being-versatile/

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Susan - thanks! Thought you might know :-)

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Tim - it is single flowered and does smell lovely!

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Ladyjustine - thanks for leaving a comment AND the award!! Second one in about a week so we must be doing something right :-).
See you were/are a teacher too!

Perpetua said...

What lovely photos of beautiful butterflies (not a species I know) on what I too think is a Philadelphus. Do we have a consensus? :-)

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Perpetua - we first saw them last summer and Susan [of Days on the Claise] told us they were Scarce Swallowtails. They are more common than Swallowtails -- as we say in the US 'go figure'!

The results of the jury is indeed that the said bush is a philladelphus or Mock Orange :-).

Tim said...

They are called Scarce Swallowtails because they were named by Victorian 'bug hunters' in the UK... where they are SCARCE summer vagrants.
I think the French name of Flambé is much better... look at it with the lead edge of the front wings at the bottom and the tails at the top and you see the flames!!

Niall & Antoinette said...

@Tim - that would explain it! The French name describes them well, when they still have their tails that is :-)